Cervical Cancer & HPV

Prevention and Early Diagnosis Articles

 

NCHR Comment on the USPSTF’s Draft Recommendations for Cervical Cancer Screening Based on our detailed analysis of currently available data, the Center strongly supports the existing USPSTF guidelines on cervical cancer screening which recommend Pap smears every 3 years starting at age 21, with the option of replacing that regimen starting at age 30 with a combination of a Pap smear and HPV test.
New guidelines on cervical cancer screening: what you need to know Should the HPV test be used in addition to or instead of a Pap smear to screen for cervical cancer? This is a hotly debated issue, and here’s what you need to know.
No more Pap smears? The committee proposes replacing Pap smears with an equally invasive but less conclusive test, the HPV test, when women reach the age of 25.
Cervical cancer screening: the key to prevention Cancer of the cervix (cervical cancer) is the second most common form of cancer among women after breast cancer. Almost all cervical cancer is caused by infection with the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). HPV can cause the cells of the cervix to grow abnormally, and abnormal cells can sometimes become pre-cancerous.
Lowering the cost of cancer treatment In 2006, cancer care accounted for an estimated $104.1 billion in medical care spending in the United States and that number will continue to increase in the upcoming years. The National Cancer Institute found that if incidence (which means the number of new cases), survival, and treatment costs stay the same, cancer costs in 2020 will show a 27% increase from 2010 solely based on the growing and aging population in the U.S. This article helps to explain some of the reasons why cancer treatment costs are so high and what can be done to help minimize these costs.
A closer look at HPV and the HPV vaccine Learn more about the effectiveness of the HPV vaccine Gardasil.
HPV: Q & A Frequently asked questions about the HPV vaccine for girls and boys.